Vietnam VPN Comparison

VPN providers with servers and IP addresses in Vietnam.

Compare your Top 3 VPN Providers:

Choose Provider 1:
Choose Provider 2:
Choose Provider 3:
Provider
Pro and Contra
Monthly Costs
Details
Client-Software
Features
Fastest Network
100 100
Pro and Contra
  • no logfiles
  • they accept bitcoin
  • quality has a price
Prices
  • 15 Months Plan (per month): (Special Offer!)
  • 49% OFF, 3 extra free Months
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $8.32
  • 6 Month Plan (per month): $9.99
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $12.95
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: British Virgin Islands
  • Countries: 94
  • Servers: 2000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Linux
  • Android
  • iOS
Features
  • Great customer support
  • Non US Company!
  • No Logfiles!
  • Supports anonymous payment
  • Very high network speed
  • 30 days money back guarantee
  • Save 49% – take 12 months +3 for free!
Visit Website
best anonymity
92 92
Pro and Contra
  • No logs are kept and anonymity is embraced
  • P2P friendly VPN service
  • Monthly subscription is not that affordable
  • Speed can vary during peak hours
Prices
  • 2 Years Plan (per month): $3.99 (66% Discount)
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $5.75
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $11.95
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: Panama
  • Countries: 61+
  • Servers: 3500+
  • IPs: 5000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Linux
  • Android
  • iOS
Features
  • Up to six simultaneous devices
  • Company based in Panama!
  • No Logfiles!
  • Bitcoins accepted
Visit Website
Best Value
90 90
Pro and Contra
  • No logs are kept, anonymity is embraced
  • accepts bitcoin
  • filesharing only partially
Prices
  • $2.75/mo - billed $99 every 3 years (79% Discount!)
  • $3.69/mo - billed $88,56 every 2 years
  • $5.99/mo - billed $71,88 every 12 months
  • $12.99/mo
  • 45 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: Romania
  • Countries: 60+
  • Windows
  • macOS
  • iOS
  • Android
  • Android TV
  • Amazon Fire TV/Stick
Features
  • Own software for connections
  • Particularly fast connections
  • Great Customer Support
  • No Logs Are Kept
  • One-click VPN Connection
  • Smart Rules (fully customizable)
  • Best Location (fastest server)
  • Easy to Use
  • 45 Days Money Back Guarantee
  • Save 79% - Take 3 years for $2.75\Month only
Visit Website
Best for China
80 80
Pro and Contra
  • No Logfiles
  • Supports many countries
  • No anonymous payment methods
  • therefore no real anonymity possible
Prices
  • 1 Month Plan (automatical renewal):
    9.95 $ (VPN basic), 12.95 $ (VPN premium)
  • 1 Year Plan:
    5.00 $ (VPN basic), 6.67 $ (VPN premium)
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Locations: Asia, Europe, USA, Oceania, Switzerland
  • Countries: 48
  • Server: 712
  • IP Adresses: 200.000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • No Logfiles!
  • Own protocol Chameleon
  • Only monthly or yearly plans
Visit Website
largest network
80 80
Pro and Contra
  • Bitcoin payment possible
  • huge number of IP adresses and servers in over 190 countries around the world
  • logs username and IP adress
  • most of the servers are located in the USA
Prices
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $6.55
  • 6 Month Plan Plan (per month): $8.33
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $11.52
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: London, UK
  • Countries: 190
  • Server: 940
  • IP Adresses: 120,000
  • Mac
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • Two connections per customer
  • own VPN Software
  • lots of countries, lots of ips, lots of servers
Visit Website
Liars! Avoid.
30 30
Pro and Contra
  • Accepts Bitcoin payment
  • Filesharing allowed
  • No free trial
  • Lied about keeping no logfiles.
Prices
  • 12 Months Plan: $6.49
  • 3 Months Plan: $8.99
  • 1 Month Plan: $10.00
Details
  • Company Location: USA
  • Countries: 60+
  • Server: 500+
  • IPs: 40,000+
  • Mac
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • Lied about keeping no Logfiles!
  • More than 15 Years network-experience
  • Lots of Servers all around the world
  • Own, feature-rich software
Visit Website
with Smart DNS
44 44
Pro and Contra
  • Bitcoin payment
  • Many payment methods available
  • They keep logfiles and:
  • They lied about keeping logfiles!
Prices
  • 24 Months Plan: $3.29/Month (70% OFF)
  • 12 Months Plan: $4.08/Month (63% OFF)
  • 1 Month Plan: $10.95
Details
  • Company from Hongkong
  • Countries: 141
  • Server: 750+
  • IP Adresses: 88,000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • Special modes for Video Streaming, Choose countries through the VPN Software
  • 70% Discount on 2 Years Packages
  • 5 Multi-logins
  • Assigns a new IP for each user
Visit Website
68 68
Pro and Contra
  • Great speed
  • No logs, advanced security and Bitcoins
  • Expensive VPN
  • No free trial and minimal refund guarantee
Prices
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $7.50
  • 6 Month Plan Plan (per month): $7.50
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $9.99
Details
  • Company Location: Bratislava
  • Countries: 42
  • Servers: 62
  • Mac OS
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iPhone
  • iPad
Features
  • Great speed No logs
  • advanced security and Bitcoins Decent support Very easy to use
Visit Website

Watch TV and live streams from Vietnam with an IP address from Vietnam

Internet censorship to be tightened in Vietnam

The Vietnamese parliament wants to pass a network security law that will force the deletion of unwanted content. Large Internet companies such as Facebook and Google appear to be cooperating with the government on censorship so as not to jeopardise their market access.

Vietnam is an economically attractive production location and provider of digital services. Despite a restrictive one-party regime, the country’s Internet policy has so far been relatively liberal. However, a law on network security is intended to considerably tighten monitoring on the Internet. The treaty obligations towards the World Trade Organization and the European Union are not being observed, as the free trade agreement between the EU and Vietnam, freedom of the press and informational self-determination are established.

This is of little interest to the Vietnamese Ministry of Public Security: national security demands greater access to the Internet, they say. The government must know who is publishing “slanderous and treacherous messages in social media”. The Vietnamese parliament is currently debating a new law that provides for extensive intervention on the Internet. The assumption is considered certain.

Before the 12th Party Congress of the Communist Party of Vietnam (CPV), which took place at the beginning of 2016, network policy and censorship played only a subordinate role. Facebook was officially banned, but with just one app and a few clicks it could be accessed easily and was part of everyday life in Hanoi’s coffee houses. The Vietnamese government did not want to deter foreign investors. The then Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung believed that it was up to the government and the ministries “to publish their own version of the truth punctually and convincingly” and not to censor criticism. In 2016 he was forced into retirement and replaced by the traditionalist Nguyen Xuan Phuc. There is no doubt that even under Dung’s government there was no freedom of the press and the Internet, but the new government is now increasingly trying to silence dissident voices on the Internet. Within a few weeks of the party conference, agreements were reached with Facebook, Google and Youtube to delete “toxic”, i.e. critical, contributions.

Currently around 55 of the 92 million Vietnamese have Internet access, and the trend is rising. Large Internet companies are therefore entering into agreements with the government so as not to jeopardise their access to the growing Vietnamese market. Google and Facebook claim to only delete profiles in Vietnam on the basis of their own “community standards”. A closer look reveals that in practice they were quick to delete user accounts that the Vietnamese government claimed were offensive or defamatory.

Founded in 2017 by the Vietnamese government, Force 47 searches the Internet for dissident and critical content. In the first half of 2017, according to Google, the Vietnamese authority called for “the removal of over 3,000 Youtube videos, mainly criticizing the Communist Party and government officials. At the end of 2017, the Vietnamese Information Minister boasted that out of 5,000 videos with “bad or toxic content” reported by the Vietnamese authorities, 4,500 had been deleted. Facebook, he added, had removed 159 “anti-government accounts” upon request.

The Vietnamese government can also exert pressure thanks to its market power. State-owned companies in Vietnam contribute almost 30 percent to the annual gross national product and employ about ten percent of all workers. The government can prohibit these companies from cooperating with platforms that do not want to cooperate with the state. If Google or Facebook were to cross the line, advertising revenue would be lost.

It seems that they are cooperating so as not to risk exclusion from the market, as in China. There, an even more repressive cyber security law obliges Internet operators to comply with comprehensive restrictions that Facebook, Twitter and Google did not want to comply with, which is why the services were banned in China. With almost 700 million Internet users, the Chinese market is now by far the largest in the world. While the big Western Internet companies are currently doing everything in their power to soften the Chinese leadership, the government in Vietnam apparently aimed to prevent Vietnam from being lost as a market by its own Vietnamese law – in the case of Facebook and Google this seems to have been successful.

The government’s cooperation with Internet companies is at the expense of network and press freedom. Since the 12th Party Congress, the situation has become increasingly delicate for opposition members who oppose the one-party state online. According to The 88 Project, a US organization that collects data on political prisoners in Vietnam, 42 people were arrested in 2017 for online publications. In 2016 there were 14 and in 2015 only eight. In addition, much longer prison sentences were imposed.