Turkey VPN Comparison

VPN providers with servers and IP addresses in Turkey.

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Provider
Pro and Contra
Monthly Costs
Details
Client-Software
Features
Fastest Network
100 100
Pro and Contra
  • no logfiles
  • they accept bitcoin
  • quality has a price
Prices
  • 15 Months Plan (per month): (Special Offer!)
  • 49% OFF, 3 extra free Months
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $8.32
  • 6 Month Plan (per month): $9.99
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $12.95
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: British Virgin Islands
  • Countries: 94
  • Servers: 2000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Linux
  • Android
  • iOS
Features
  • Great customer support
  • Non US Company!
  • No Logfiles!
  • Supports anonymous payment
  • Very high network speed
  • 30 days money back guarantee
  • Save 49% – take 12 months +3 for free!
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best anonymity
92 92
Pro and Contra
  • No logs are kept and anonymity is embraced
  • P2P friendly VPN service
  • Monthly subscription is not that affordable
  • Speed can vary during peak hours
Prices
  • 2 Years Plan (per month): $3.99 (66% Discount)
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $5.75
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $11.95
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: Panama
  • Countries: 61+
  • Servers: 3500+
  • IPs: 5000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Linux
  • Android
  • iOS
Features
  • Up to six simultaneous devices
  • Company based in Panama!
  • No Logfiles!
  • Bitcoins accepted
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Best for China
80 80
Pro and Contra
  • No Logfiles
  • Supports many countries
  • No anonymous payment methods
  • therefore no real anonymity possible
Prices
  • 1 Month Plan (automatical renewal):
    9.95 $ (VPN basic), 12.95 $ (VPN premium)
  • 1 Year Plan:
    5.00 $ (VPN basic), 6.67 $ (VPN premium)
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Locations: Asia, Europe, USA, Oceania, Switzerland
  • Countries: 48
  • Server: 712
  • IP Adresses: 200.000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • No Logfiles!
  • Own protocol Chameleon
  • Only monthly or yearly plans
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80 80
Pro and Contra
  • No Logfiles
  • Bitcoin payment
  • Small number of countries and servers
Prices
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): €4.16 (Plus), €9.16 (Premium)
  • 6 Month Plan Plan (per month): €4.99 (Plus), €10.83 (Premium)
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): €7.99 (Plus), €16.99 (Premium)
Details
  • Company Location: Malaysia
  • Countries: 24
  • Server: 88
  • IP Adresses: n/A
  • Windows
  • iOS
  • Linux
  • Android
  • Mac
Features
  • No Logfiles
  • Free version
  • Website in english and german available
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largest network
80 80
Pro and Contra
  • Bitcoin payment possible
  • huge number of IP adresses and servers in over 190 countries around the world
  • logs username and IP adress
  • most of the servers are located in the USA
Prices
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $6.55
  • 6 Month Plan Plan (per month): $8.33
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $11.52
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: London, UK
  • Countries: 190
  • Server: 940
  • IP Adresses: 120,000
  • Mac
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • Two connections per customer
  • own VPN Software
  • lots of countries, lots of ips, lots of servers
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76 76
Pro and Contra
  • advanced anonymity features like server cascading
  • no logfiles
  • small number of servers
  • quite lengthy setup
Prices
  • 24 Months Plan (per Month): 8,95 €
  • 12 Months Plan (per Month):9,99 €
  • 3 Months Plan (per Month): 11,98 €
  • 1 Months Plan: 12,99 €
Details
  • Company-Location: Switzerland
  • Countries: 23
  • Server: 36
  • IPs: unknown
  • Android
  • Linux
  • Windows
  • Mac OS X
  • iOS
Features Visit Website
Liars! Avoid.
30 30
Pro and Contra
  • Accepts Bitcoin payment
  • Filesharing allowed
  • No free trial
  • Lied about keeping no logfiles.
Prices
  • 12 Months Plan: $6.49
  • 3 Months Plan: $8.99
  • 1 Month Plan: $10.00
Details
  • Company Location: USA
  • Countries: 60+
  • Server: 500+
  • IPs: 40,000+
  • Mac
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • Lied about keeping no Logfiles!
  • More than 15 Years network-experience
  • Lots of Servers all around the world
  • Own, feature-rich software
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70 70
Pro and Contra
  • no logfiles
  • they accept Bitcoin
  • No free trial
  • A bit pricey for monthly subscriptions
Prices
  • 2 Years Plan (per month): $2.25
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $3.33
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $9.95
  • 30 Days Money Back Guarantee
Details
  • Company Location: Hong Kong
  • Countries: 44
  • Servers: 250+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Android
  • iOS
  • Linux
Features
  • Non US Company!
  • Supports Bitcoin
  • No Logfiles!
  • 30 days money back guarantee
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with Smart DNS
44 44
Pro and Contra
  • Bitcoin payment
  • Many payment methods available
  • They keep logfiles and:
  • They lied about keeping logfiles!
Prices
  • 24 Months Plan: $3.29/Month (70% OFF)
  • 12 Months Plan: $4.08/Month (63% OFF)
  • 1 Month Plan: $10.95
Details
  • Company from Hongkong
  • Countries: 141
  • Server: 750+
  • IP Adresses: 88,000+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • Special modes for Video Streaming, Choose countries through the VPN Software
  • 70% Discount on 2 Years Packages
  • 5 Multi-logins
  • Assigns a new IP for each user
Visit Website
80 80
Pro and Contra
  • No logfiles
  • Bitcoin payment
  • has servers in just a few countries
  • US company (NSA)
Prices
  • 12 Months Plan: $3.33
  • 3 Months Plan: $5.99
  • 1 Month Plan: $6.95
Details
  • Company Location: USA
  • Countries: 10
  • Server: 987+
  • IPs: 7000
  • iOS
  • Android
  • Linux
  • Windows
  • Mac
Features
  • Bitcoin payment
  • File sharing allowed
  • 7 days money back guarantee
Visit Website
80 80
Pro and Contra
  • Bitcoin payment
  • keeps connection logs for 7 days
Prices
  • 12 Months Plan: $4.84 (Ultimate), $4.07 (Total), $3.08 (EU)
  • 1 Month Plan: $10.95 (Ultimate), $7.95 (Total), $4.95 (EU)
Details
  • Company Location: Romania
  • Countries: 33
  • Server: 80
  • Mac
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • Offers also Familypackages
  • P2P/Filesharing allowed on CA-, RU-, SE-, HK-, NL- and LU-Servers
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60 60
Pro and Contra
  • one of the experienced providers: since 1995 in business
  • US company
  • a little expensive compared to others
Prices
  • 12 Months Plan: from $5.83
  • 1 Month Plan: from $10.00
Details
  • Company Location: USA
  • Countries: 22
  • Server: 458
  • IPs: 87,000
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • One of the oldest VPN Providers - since 1995 in the business
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60 60
Pro and Contra
  • Bitcoin payment
  • Free Trial
  • complicated price structure
Prices
  • 1 Month Plan: $4.95 HTTP Proxy, $7.95 PPTP, $9.95 SSH SOCKS5, $9.95 OpenVPN, $13.95 OpenVPN&PPTP
  • 6 Months Plan: $4.15 HTTP Proxy, $6.66 PPTP, $8.33 SSH SOCKS5, $8.33 OpenVPN, $9.99 OpenVPN&PPTP
Details
  • Company Location: Australia
  • Countries: 46
  • Server: 68
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Linux
  • Android
  • iOS
Features
  • Free Trial Version
  • Bitcoin as Payment Method
  • Offers VPN- , DNS- and Proxy-Services
  • No Logs
Visit Website
80 80
Pro and Contra
  • no logfiles
  • supports bitcoin
  • small number of servers / ips compared to other providers
  • US based company (NSA)
Prices
  • 1 Month Plan: $9.99
  • 3 Months Plan: $6.66
  • 12 Months Plan: $4.99
Details
  • Company Location: USA
  • Countries: 25
  • Server: 200+
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Linux
  • iOS
  • Android
Features
  • No provider logs
  • Specialist for Torrent/p2p
Visit Website
68 68
Pro and Contra
  • Great speed
  • No logs, advanced security and Bitcoins
  • Expensive VPN
  • No free trial and minimal refund guarantee
Prices
  • 1 Year Plan (per month): $7.50
  • 6 Month Plan Plan (per month): $7.50
  • 1 Month Plan (per month): $9.99
Details
  • Company Location: Bratislava
  • Countries: 42
  • Servers: 62
  • Mac OS
  • Windows
  • Linux
  • iPhone
  • iPad
Features
  • Great speed No logs
  • advanced security and Bitcoins Decent support Very easy to use
Visit Website

Watch TV and live streams from Turkey with an IP address from Turkey

If you want to compare the best VPN services which provide a server location in turkey, check out www.vpnhizmeti.net. They are specialized on vpn solutions for the beautiful country of the ottomans, kebab and nar suyu :)

Journalism in Turkey: Between Censorship and Self-Censorship

161 Turkish journalists are imprisoned. Their free colleagues are facing repression. Censorship and self-censorship have become part of everyday life, fear and pressure are on the rise, Turkish journalists report.

The Turkish journalist Bahadir Özgür has worked in the Turkish media for 12 years. He recently gave up his job. “When Prime Minister Binali Yildirim in January gave directors and media representatives of major newspapers and television stations a 15-point plan as a guideline for reporting the military offensive in Syria, the moment had come for me to make up my mind. I read through these 15 points and found that they did not even meet the minimum standards for journalism. I would not have been able to work under these conditions. So I quit,” says Özgür.

His then employer, the largest media company in Turkey, the Dogan Group, was sold to the Demirören Group a few weeks ago. It is known for its proximity to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. This was also a trigger for some journalists to change employers or give up their jobs.

Millions in fines for investigative stories

According to Özgür, reporting on “certain” issues has become impossible since 2002, when Erdogan’s AKP party came to power. As an example, he cites a case he experienced during his time with the business magazine “Referans”. His colleagues had researched an investigative story that investigated the question of how the families of some AKP members of parliament could suddenly become successful businessmen.

After the publication of this history the magazine received a tax fine at a value of 6,8 million Lira (1,5 million euro). Since then it has become difficult according to Özgür to write reports on interdependencies between economics and government members.

Warnings by Whatsapp

Another Turkish journalist who works for a national station and doesn’t want to be mentioned by name explains what censorship looks like: “Sometimes the editors or reporters get an e-mail, a phone call or a message by whatsapp, in which the most popular sentence at the moment is written, namely ‘We’ve already got enough of this message’. After this message the battle begins with one’s own bad conscience. One turns to the superior, well aware that this will not change anything. But at least one keeps one’s own ability to think critically.”

Self-censorship like a virus

Another journalist who talks to us also works in the so-called mainstream media. He doesn’t want to mention his name either. In his opinion, Turkish journalists have now internalised self-censorship to such an extent that they no longer address some topics or prefer to avoid certain expressions when writing an article. He and his colleagues would have a “sense” for topics that the government would not like. They would not deal with them either.

“Self-censorship spreads like a virus,” he says. “Whether you’re an editor or a director, once you’re in a national broadcaster, you’re in a restricted area.” If a report critical of the government goes online “by mistake”, the editor in charge either gets a reminder or is fired directly, he says.

Since the beginning of the year, a total of 520 lawsuits have been filed against journalists. According to a survey by the Susma platform (non-silence platform) on censorship and self-censorship in Turkey, 54 percent of respondents believe that it is now impossible to write an article without censoring oneself. 96 percent claim that trials against journalists lead to journalists and authors censoring themselves. 186 people were interviewed.

Taboo topics for journalists

An online editor who also wants to remain anonymous complains about the so-called “red lines” in the Turkish media landscape. “Between the years 2007-2012 the Gülen movement was not allowed to be reported on. Since 2012 there have been critical reports about Erdogan,” says the journalist of an online portal. In recent months, the operation “olive branch” of the Turkish armed forces in Afrin, the possible opposition leader in the upcoming parliamentary elections, protests against nuclear power plants or cases of corruption have become the red lines that better not be reported on. Reporting on critical issues depends on the willingness of individual journalists or their media houses to take risks.

About Turkey

Turkey (officially Türkiye Cumhuriyeti (T.C.), German Republic of Turkey) is a democratic republic in Near East and Southeast Europe. Since its foundation in 1923, the unitary state has been characterized by secularism and Kemalism; after the First World War it became the successor state of the Ottoman Empire.

Turkey extends geographically over two continents, Europe and Asia. Although it is mainly located in the Near East, the European Eastern Trakia is also part of its territory. Thus it has control over the Bosporus, the access to the Black Sea. Due to its strategic position, Turkey has great influence in the region and in the Middle East. Most Turks live in the Asian western half of the country. The east and southeast of the Anatolian highlands are Kurdish areas.

Turkey’s economic situation is still very contradictory. There is a very large gap between the industrialized West (especially the large metropolises) on the one hand and the agriculturally structured and underdeveloped East on the other. Since 3 October 2005, Turkey’s accession negotiations with the European Union have been in progress, with interruptions. However, these are currently (2017) on hold due to Turkey’s current development.

Tourism plays an important role for Turkey. In 2014 there were about 41 million visitors, four million of them from Russia. German tourists led the statistics with around 5 million visitors. In 2016, tourism figures fell by a third due to the political situation.

In general, travelers in Istanbul, Ankara and other major cities in Turkey are advised to be more cautious. Political tensions, violent clashes and terrorist attacks can be expected throughout the country. Travel to the border region of Turkey with Syria and Iraq, in particular to the cities Diyarbakır, Mardin, Cizre, Silopi, Idil, Yüksekova and Nusaybin as well as generally to the provinces Şırnak and Hakkâri is strongly discouraged.